First of all, I  might not have covered all of what the book bears because I tend to forget a lot. I was hesitant whether to call it a review since I feel it’s much more of a bird’s eye view; that is, vaguely covering what the novel is about. But I venture to label it as a short review. Without further ado, allow me to go straight to the point.

This review is subject to my personal view, and I regard the novel as a timeless work that still relates to humanity on a large-scale. Gabriel Marquez Garcia was a Columbian novelist, short-story writer, screenwriter, and a journalist. He was most known as “Gabo” in his homeland. He was one of the most significant authors of the 20

Gabriel Marquez Garcia was a Columbian novelist, short-story writer, screenwriter, and a journalist. He was most known as “Gabo” in his homeland. He was one of the most significant authors of the 20th century. His fame paved the way down for him to be a Nobel laureate in literature in 1982.

Indisputably, One Hundred Years of Solitude is one of his eminent works. Published in 1967, One Hundred Years of Solitude achieved, as most of his works, significant critical acclaim and widespread commercial success. That said, the novel promoted a literary style known as “magical realism”, which depends on the usage of magical elements and events in order to define and explain real experiences.

The entangled story tells about the bloodline of José Arcadio Buendia, who was the founder of Macondo—the village in which most of the events unfold—along with his wife, Ursula Iguaran. The mythical village witnesses the rise and fall of the family throughout the novel’s most prominent themes: Death, incest, and most importantly, Solitude.

Ironically, the chronicle of life and death follows a tragicomedy; a moment you are weeping, the other you feel happy for an incest couple, the next you are laughing. If anything, the story of the Buendia family is but a depiction of all humanity.

Love and lust, revolutions and wars, greed and misery, riches and poverty, youth and elderly, death and solitude, the quest for the truth and eternal peace, corruption, Modernity, evil and innocence, Sex, social classes, all characterise the frenzy embedded in the novel’s broader themes.

One aspect of the novel has really intrigued my attention; that is, the cyclic use of names. Most of the new baby borns are called either José Arcadio or Aureliano, and almost all of them share the same personalities as their ancestors. Furthermore, regarding the cyclic use of names, one can only understand that we are defined by our parents and ancestors, meaning that our fates are determined by actions that we cannot grasp.

The breadth of the novel extends to cover the political, personal, and spiritual to mould a new consciousness to storytelling.

I have been reading it for more than three weeks because I was somewhat busy. In the midst of my reading sessions, however, I happened to notice the huge similarities between the book and George R. R. Martin’s Game of Thrones book series/TV show. One hundred years of solitude’s most dominant and prominent themes are death and incest, which is actually the case in Game of Thrones.

Consequently, thus far, I concluded, not decisively, that George R. R. Martin was influenced by One Hundred Years of Solitude. In fact, if you come to think of it, Gabriel Marquez was one of the first to use magical realism, and George’s book series have a tendency towards magical realism since some of the passages are based on historical events that unfolded hundreds of years ago. E.g. The war of roses. I do not think it is a mere coincidence, but rather George’s style is nothing but an inspiration of Gabriel’s exemplary piece of literary work.

I do not think it is a mere coincidence, but rather, George’s style is nothing but an inspiration of Gabriel’s exemplary piece of literary work. It is, indeed, I suppose, a must read book.

 

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