O me! O writer’s block!

What is worse than being faced with a dreadful blank page? A heavy burden distresses you as you struggle to transcribe thoughts into words, hoping to establish a logical connection between thoughts and language. Not only is the struggle with the blank page before you. Your ego and endeavor for perfection become notorious enemies.

A split, then, occurs between a confident self and a doubtful mind, and it only bolsters this ever-increasing epidemic parasite. And, as if it is not already worse, you lose faith in your ability to write cohesively and coherently, causing a total collapse in one’s mind, sometimes driving the little sane left in you insane. It is a cosmopolitan contamination!

Personally, blank pages petrify me inasmuch as I lose my senses, for I am a perfectionist, and I hate to see rubbish on the paper. I want it all done painstakingly. I was deceiving myself. “Oh, I can very well write about this, but I am not going to do that, because I know I can, and I just don’t want to,” I thought. I deliberately did this to avoid direct contact with the unnerving blank page.

But what’s the use of a blank page if it is not to host your decrepit, untidy words? What good will it do you?

To bend myself to my will, although it felt ego shattering, I scribbled meanderingly on the blank page. To aimlessly write felt of freedom, a soldier in haste to embrace his motherland after years of loyally serving outside the country’s borders, a blind person whose eyes sucked the marrow of light for the first time. For once, I let go of the perfect, self-incurred image that hindered my depositing of words. I allowed myself not to think while I impregnated blankness, desiccate words dance on the frameless—now cluttered—page.

A suckling crying for his mother’s bosom, and once sealing his lips on the perky, ailing nipples, he would not stop until his thirst is quenched. And so is my relationship with words. Once I play around with them, they may go lively or might as well end up dead—doomed to meaninglessness.

So, what’s the fuss all about?

I followed a process I had once read about on the internet. This process is so simple that you may mistake it for a hoax at first. Thought-dumping: a hero in the shadows that saved me countless times—and certainly, when I needed it most.

The point being is that you have to write whatever wanders through your mind, a sugar-coated stream of consciousness. All you have to do is pour out your thoughts (Thou shalt bring them into existence), however lacking and gibberish they are. Even the idea that you are trying to counterattack writer’s block should be jotted down; a desultory writing. The pivotal thing to remember is not to let your brain censure you—or nip your thoughts in the bud. Don’t think about someone else reading your nonsense (the thought is horrifying, I know); instead, think of the masterpiece you’ll refine out of the nonsense you write.

It is believed that this process kills whatever background processes that trouble your brain, helping you achieve clarity. What is more, it boosts your creativity, the flow of writing, and it immunes you against future potential blocks!

I personally use two methods: a) I write incoherently for a determined amount of time, say 15 minutes; b) Well, there isn’t much to it. Write until you find inspiration, and, virtually, one always end up with a subject within arm’s reach.

Perfection, or lack thereof, does not matter. The process of writing is what, in the end, counts. So write, dear. Allow yourself to write rubbish and let not the blank page assail you, planting seeds of self-doubt inside you. Be bold enough and face it, purge your unfathomable speculation upon it. After all, consistency is key! Repeat this process on a daily basis.

 

TL;DR: Write nonsense, write rubbish, write crap, defecate on the page, but don’t leave it blank—and most importantly, let it come from your guts!

 

P.S: This article would not have happened without a long dispute with myself. I won. The daunting block is not dead; it’ll come haunting me again, but I should be armed and ready!

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